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Who Has the Better Logo Redesign: GM or Kia?

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Both General Motors and Kia presented new brand logos this week—but which is best?

It’s not often car manufacturers tinker with their badge. This week we saw two. We’ve broken down the redesigns for both General Motors and Kia down below, and we pose the question to you, dear readers: which one did it better?

General Motors

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Earlier today, General Motors unveiled its latest logo, only the fifth time the company has significantly changed it in 113 years. It’s a familiar evolution of the previous badge: it’s still roughly square-shaped, and the two initials remain in place. The General has gone for lowercase lettering this time though—think “i’m loving it” from McDonald’s. GM has also switched to a softer, curvier font, for what it says is a “modern, inclusive feel.”

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The bounding box is now a curved-corner square, similar to app icons on an iPhone. GM’s thrown a blue gradient on the whole package, which has evoked more than a few comparisons to ’90s WordArt across Twitter. The underline moves over to just the m, with the negative space between it and the letter meant to show a plug. The American company isn’t being coy: this rebrand is all about its Ultium battery tech, and a heavy push towards EVs that will see 30 new models across its brands by 2030.

SEE ALSO: 2020 Cadillac CT5-V Review: My Name is My Name

The redesign coincides with the brand’s new tagline, “Everybody in.” GM is very specifically tying the rebrand to its massive $27-billion investment in EVs, and believes now is the tipping point for the technology.

Which vehicles will lead GM into the electric future? Right now we’ve seen the Cadillac Lyriq and GMC Hummer EV, and both will touch down within the next year or two. We’ll find out more at GM’s virtual CES showcase, and the restyled corporate website will go live on Monday, January 11.

Kia

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Kia has gone a very different direction for its new identity. Debuting on Wednesday, it ditches the staid oval badge of before for an angular wordmark. The old logo was in use since Kia began selling cars on this continent a quarter-century ago.

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The Korean automaker used hundreds of firework-launching drones to show off the logo—enough to earn it a Guinness World Record, in fact. Kia says the edgy new look symbolizes the brand’s “confidence and commitment to customers.” We’ll leave you to decide that one. Kia’s cars have changed drastically since the ’90s, and we’d argue this new badge should look right at home in the Tiger Nose grille of the new K5 or Sorento. Unlike GM, Kia has only shown off the new logo in flat black; not counting the fireworks display, anyway. Kia also hasn’t tied its design so closely to its electric future, which will focus on the Hyundai Group’s E-GMP platform.

SEE ALSO: 2021 Kia Sorento Review: First Drive

Kia has a new slogan as well: “Movement that inspires.” The tagline, logo, and what’s sure to be cars featuring the latter will feature on a digital “New Kia Brand Showcase” event Friday, January 15.

Which of these two redesigns do you think is more successful? Sound off in the comments.

Become an AutoGuide insider. Get the latest from the automotive world first by subscribing to our newsletter here.

The post Who Has the Better Logo Redesign: GM or Kia? appeared first on AutoGuide.com.

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      Instead of updating or redesigning the Optima, Kia has rid the North American market of the car altogether.

      In its place arrives the new 2021 Kia K5. To be fair, the Optima was always called the K5 in South Korea. So Kia has essentially done away with the Optima name and now its new mid-size sedan will be identified as K5 all across the globe. The K5 is all set to take the fight to its rivals in the mid-size sedan market and it seems well equipped to do so. So here are five cool features in the 2021 Kia K5 that could change the game.
      SEE ALSO: 2021 Kia K5 Revealed: 290 HP and AWD for Sporty Optima Replacement
      A Diet Stinger Please

      Gone are the days when mid-size sedans we considered too beige. Today, aesthetically at least they can give more upscale cars a run for their money. And the K5 epitomizes that ethos. It looks like Kia’s flagship GT, the Stinger, went on a diet and chiseled itself by some serious weight training. The front nose is sharp and the sleek fascia with its front fender-intruding DRLS and all-LED headlamps is enough to turn heads. It sits on the same N3 platform as the Hyundai Sonata and if that’s any clue, it sits lower than before and the sloping roofline creates coupe-like profile that looks sporty. The best part? It’s not all show and no go.
      SEE ALSO: 2020 Hyundai Sonata Review
      Turbo Power

      Along with a striking design, thankfully Kia has also introduced an engine that would make many an enthusiast take notice. Sure there is the 1.6-turbo GDI. But the engine of interest here is the 2.5-liter four-cylinder turbo from the upcoming Genesis G80. It makes 290 hp of max power and 311 lb-ft of torque which according to Kia is “best-in-class”. It also comes with a segment-exclusive eight-speed wet, dual-clutch transmission and AWD (another first for Kia). All trims are available with AWD except the base LX.
      SEE ALSO: 2021 Genesis G80 Here To Make Rivals Nervous, Priced From $48,725
      Continuously Variable What?
      Yes, we are still harping on about the engines. As desirable as the 2.5-liter turbo is, the 1.6-liter GDI comes with its own set of innovations. Kia has introduced an industry-first Continuously Variable Valve Duration system, or CVVD. Unlike variable valve timing, CVVD allows for individual valves to remain open or closed for extended periods depending on how the car is being driven. If the car is at a constant speed, the system will allow the intake valves to be open from the middle to the end of the compression stroke so as to minimize resistance during compression. If the car is being driven fast, the system closes the intake during the same stroke to maximize air utilization during the explosion stage.
      The system can increase fuel efficiency by five percent, increase power by four percent and cuts emissions by 12 percent.
      SEE ALSO: 2020 Hyundai Sonata Hybrid Review
      All-Paw-Drive

      This is the first time Kia has equipped its sedan with all-wheel-drive. Though it is a front-wheel-drive based system, which essentially means that it is on-demand and will engage AWD when the system detects a loss in traction at the nose. The system is optional on all trims except the base LX and comes as standard on the GT trim with the 2.5-liter turbo.
      A Cabin From Above?

      The cabin of the K5 truly looks like from a class above. The upholstery looks premium and upmarket. Kia will also offer two infotainment screen sizes in the K5, an 8.0-inch unit, and a 10.25-inch wide-screen system. Kia will also offer Apple CarPlay and Android Auto as standard. Though both will be wireless (another first), that ability will be available with the 8.0-inch screen only. Our guess? Compatibility issues maybe. Though it will also come with natural voice recognition which will allow occupants to operate things like the aircon with voice commands.
      Other features include an upgraded Bose sound system and smart key that allows you to not only start your car but operate the climate control system as well.
      The 2021 Kia K5 goes on sale by late summer and the GT version will arrive in fall. Prices will be revealed closer to the launch.
      The post Top 5 Coolest Features of the New Kia K5 appeared first on AutoGuide.com.
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    • By Kiaclub Nieuwsrobot
      Kia has released the first images of the fourth-generation Sedona—or Carnival in other markets—showing off a new, stately appearance.
      Begun, the minivan wars have. Chrysler fired the first salvo with the redesigned 2021 Pacifica. Then just a month ago, Toyota revealed the all-new, all-hybrid Sienna. Kia would not sit this one out, and it’s now provided the first look at the fourth-generation Sedona minivan.
      Loading … Technically, this isn’t the Sedona; it’s the Carnival, the name Kia’s people-mover uses in other markets. Also, unlike its competition, Kia has rid the Carnival/Sedona of the minivan name and insists on calling its new boxy people mover a “Grand Utility Vehicle’ possibly to accentuate its SUV-esque design lines. Before we get too excited about this absolute looker of a minivan, pardon, Grand Utility Vehicle, we would like to clarify that the Sedona will not be coming to the US this year. It will go on sale in South Korea in the third quarter of this year and will probably arrive in North America by late 2021 as a 2022 model. 

      Head-on, you can easily mistake the new Sedona for an SUV. It features short overhangs and a bold new face with a massive tiger-nose grille and the full-width LED DRLs. The massive grille along with the sculpted front bumper and the slightly flared wheel arches are all quintessential SUV design elements. Plus, the flush-fitting headlamps inside the grille give the Carnival an air of sophistication. The massive greenhouse, sliding doors, and the tall, boxy shape however are quintessential minivan. Plus, the shoulder line that extends from the headlamps to the tail lamps further emphasizes the van’s sheer size.

      It features a floating roof design while the C-pillar carries a chrome strip that extends into the rear of the car. The tailamps are an all-LED affair with an LED strip running the width of the tailgate.  Kia states that it features a longer wheelbase than before and will be more spacious than the current car. There are no images of the cabin available yet, but the “limousine” badge on the tailgate shows that the one pictured here is the top trim and will come with all bells and whistles. 
      Kia is also keeping mum about the specs but we think when it comes to the US, it will carry over its current 3.3-liter V6 and also add a hybrid powertrain to its lineup.
      The post 2022 Kia Sedona Puts a Stylish SUV Spin on the Minivan appeared first on AutoGuide.com.
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